ch3-ch2-o-ch2-ch3:

howtohavesexwithaghost:

cosmic-darkness:

This is the kinda beautiful shit i desperately need in my room.

i fUCKING NEED THIS NOW IN MY ROOM

See something like this in my room make existing about life

sci-universe:

Astrophotography from 1908 — 1919

These images were taken about 100 years ago. I can’t even describe how much respect I have for early astronomers.

Image courtesy: Yerkes Observatory, Royal Observatory of Greenwich, Mount Wilson Observatory

spacettf:

The Rosette Nebula (Caldwell 49) by Terry Hancock www.downunderobservatory.com on Flickr.Via Flickr:
Here shown as a color and narrowband hybrid image, this active star forming nebula lies in the Monoceros Constellation (the Unicorn) only 5,200 light-years distant.  This massive cloud of hydrogen has been condensing to form new stars and is thought to be very similar to the environment that gave birth to our own Solar System.
Captured from my backyard observatory in fremont, Michigan USA. This is a composite of data captured using QHY11 and QHY9 Monochrome CCD Cameras. Both broadband and narrowband filters were used with Hydrogen-Alpha mapped to Red, SII mapped to Green and OIII mapped to Blue and Green channels.  
Total Exposure time 11 hours 48 mins. 
Equipment
QHY11S monochrome CCD cooled to -20C 
QHY9M monochrome CCD cooled to -30C 
Thomas M. Back TMB 92SS F5.5 APO Refractor
Takahashi E-180 F2.8 Astrograph
Paramount GT-1100S German Equatorial Mount (with MKS 4000)
Image Acquisition Maxim DL
Stacking and Calibrating: CCDStack
Registration of images in Registar
Post Processing Photoshop CS5 

spacettf:

The Rosette Nebula (Caldwell 49) by Terry Hancock www.downunderobservatory.com on Flickr.

Via Flickr:
Here shown as a color and narrowband hybrid image, this active star forming nebula lies in the Monoceros Constellation (the Unicorn) only 5,200 light-years distant. This massive cloud of hydrogen has been condensing to form new stars and is thought to be very similar to the environment that gave birth to our own Solar System.


Captured from my backyard observatory in fremont, Michigan USA. This is a composite of data captured using QHY11 and QHY9 Monochrome CCD Cameras. Both broadband and narrowband filters were used with Hydrogen-Alpha mapped to Red, SII mapped to Green and OIII mapped to Blue and Green channels.
Total Exposure time 11 hours 48 mins.


Equipment
QHY11S monochrome CCD cooled to -20C
QHY9M monochrome CCD cooled to -30C
Thomas M. Back TMB 92SS F5.5 APO Refractor
Takahashi E-180 F2.8 Astrograph
Paramount GT-1100S German Equatorial Mount (with MKS 4000)
Image Acquisition Maxim DL
Stacking and Calibrating: CCDStack
Registration of images in Registar
Post Processing Photoshop CS5 

ktt:

Illuminated Code from Space - Macrocosm and Microcosm by Haari Tesla

An experiment with images of space with tilt shift which resulted in nebulae, galaxies, and supernovae transformed into microorganisms.

Macrocosm and microcosm is an ancient Greek Neo-Platonic schema of seeing the same patterns reproduced in all levels of the cosmos, from the largest all the way down to the smallest scale.

8bitfuture:

First world problems.

8bitfuture:

First world problems.

8bitfuture:

Image: Runaway star seen by Spitzer space telescope.
Roguish runaway stars can have a big impact on their surroundings as they plunge through the Milky Way galaxy. Their high-speed encounters shock the galaxy, creating arcs, as seen in this newly released image from NASA’s Spitzer Space Telescope.
In this case, the speedster star is known as Kappa Cassiopeiae, or HD 2905 to astronomers. It is a massive, hot supergiant moving at around 2.5 million mph relative to its neighbors (1,100 kilometers per second). But what really makes the star stand out in this image is the surrounding, streaky red glow of material in its path. Such structures are called bow shocks, and they can often be seen in front of the fastest, most massive stars in the galaxy.
Bow shocks form where the magnetic fields and wind of particles flowing off a star collide with the diffuse, and usually invisible, gas and dust that fill the space between stars. How these shocks light up tells astronomers about the conditions around the star and in space. Slow-moving stars like our sun have bow shocks that are nearly invisible at all wavelengths of light, but fast stars like Kappa Cassiopeiae create shocks that can be seen by Spitzer’s infrared detectors.

8bitfuture:

Image: Runaway star seen by Spitzer space telescope.

Roguish runaway stars can have a big impact on their surroundings as they plunge through the Milky Way galaxy. Their high-speed encounters shock the galaxy, creating arcs, as seen in this newly released image from NASA’s Spitzer Space Telescope.

In this case, the speedster star is known as Kappa Cassiopeiae, or HD 2905 to astronomers. It is a massive, hot supergiant moving at around 2.5 million mph relative to its neighbors (1,100 kilometers per second). But what really makes the star stand out in this image is the surrounding, streaky red glow of material in its path. Such structures are called bow shocks, and they can often be seen in front of the fastest, most massive stars in the galaxy.

Bow shocks form where the magnetic fields and wind of particles flowing off a star collide with the diffuse, and usually invisible, gas and dust that fill the space between stars. How these shocks light up tells astronomers about the conditions around the star and in space. Slow-moving stars like our sun have bow shocks that are nearly invisible at all wavelengths of light, but fast stars like Kappa Cassiopeiae create shocks that can be seen by Spitzer’s infrared detectors.

spaceexp:

Orion photo by Helmut R. Kahr

spaceexp:

Orion photo by Helmut R. Kahr